Transportation Planning

Long-Range Transportation Planning

The primary function of the Long-Range team is to provide assistance in all of the County’s long-range planning efforts, which includes but is not limited to the review and preparation of the transportation infrastructure section for all master plans, general plans, and sector plans; maintenance and application of the County’s long-range forecast model; assistance in County Map Amendments and Sector Plan Amendments; the review of Mandatory Referral applications and Clearinghouse requests; and other special assignments/requests as they relate to long-range planning.  Planners assigned to the Long-Range Team will serve as the point of contact for all long-range transportation planning needs and questions for the section, division, and department. 

Duties and Responsibilities

Tacoma Langley Transportation Hub

The Transportation Planning Section employs two separate teams to encourage efficient and effective delivery of the goals and objectives of the section. In addition, the section has a full-time Pedestrian/Bicycle Coordinator who is responsible for assisting in all aspects of active transportation planning. 

Duties and Responsibilities

Long-Range Planning Team

The Transportation Planning Service (TPS) Supervisor provides technical assistance to the Long-Range Planning staff. He or she also represents TPS in outreach meetings with citizens and other stakeholders. TPS approval is required for all scopes of services and billing for long-range transportation planning contracts. 

The Long-Range Team Lead represents TPS in organizational meetings with the Community Planning Division and delegates assignments to Long-Range Planners. Reviews all scope of services and billing for all Long-Range Planning contracts; supports Long-Range planners in Planning Board or Council hearings or briefings when necessary. 

The Transportation Modeler manages the County’s Transportation Planning Travel Demand Forecasting Model serves as the liaison to the Department, County, and all external agencies. Assists the TPS Long Range Planners and Community Planning Division staff with applying transportation demand modeling for long-range planning projects. 

The Long-Range Planner manages TPS long-range planning efforts and is a liaison and resource to the Community Planning Division. Reviews technical analysis associated with long-range community planning projects; represents TPS in outreach meetings with citizens and other stakeholders. Drafts all correspondence, final memos, or technical reports when needed. 

Site Analysis Team

The Transportation Planning Service (TPS) Supervisor provides approval for final memos (“referrals”); represents TPS in pre-application conferences when needed; provides technical assistance to Site Analysis Team reviewers; and supports the Team Lead and Site Analysis Team reviewers in PB or Council public hearings/briefings when necessary. 

Site Analysis Team Lead serves as the primary representative for TPS in pre-application conferences and conducts pre-acceptance reviews of development applications. Assigns development applications to reviewers; supports DRD reviewers in PB or Council hearings or briefings when necessary. 

The Reviewer carries out technical analysis associated with development applications for Dundee and a comprehensive multi-modal transportation planning analysis of development applications. 

Pedestrian and Bicycle Coordinator

The Ped/Bike Coordinator leads all bicycle and pedestrian planning efforts for TPS. Duties include but are not limited to representing TPS in outreach meetings with citizens and other stakeholders. Also serve as the liaison to the Department, County, and external agencies regarding Ped-Bike efforts and projects. 

Transportation Studies

Resources

Reference Data

Maps & Technical Data

The Approved Countywide Master Plan of Transportation is available online.

Maps

  1. Joint Base Andrews Quadrant (PDF)
  2. Largo/Watkins Regional Park Quadrant (PDF)
  3. National Harbor/Oxon Hill/Forest Heights Quadrant (PDF)
  4. South Bowie Quadrant (PDF)
  5. Westphalia Quadrant (PDF)

Technical Data

This layer represents an inventory of planned rights-of-way (ROW) for Prince George’s County as graphically shown in the master plans, sector plans, and the Countywide Master Plan of Transportation (MPOT). This inventory of ROW was originally created by digitizing proposed master plan alignments from 200-foot-scale paper maps. While the alignments depicted in master plans, sector plans and the MPOT are largely illustrative and may not be considered legally sufficient, the alignments shown in the Prince George’s Atlas are drawn to scale and represent the most accurate location as intended in the master plans. To access the planned right-of-way, view the Prince George Atlas Instructions (PDF).

Map Updates

These maps are maintained by staff within the Transportation Planning Section of the Countywide Planning Division. As future master plan ROW’s are identified or amended through the master plan, sector plan, development review, and/or capital project planning processes, this coverage will be revised or maintained accordingly regularly by Transportation Planning Section staff.

Adequate Public Facilities

A preliminary subdivision plan must accompany a traffic impact study if the proposed development generates 50 trips or more during peak hours. Traffic studies for proposed developments of this size or larger are prepared by the applicant and reviewed by staff in order for the Planning Board to make the required findings regarding the adequacy of transportation facilities in the Subdivision Ordinance. In cases where a development generates fewer than 50 trips, the transportation staff must still review the preliminary plan in order for the Planning Board to make the required findings and may request (but not require) a limited traffic study or traffic counts to assist in making these findings. Developments generating five or fewer peak hour trips may be deemed to have a minimal, or de minimus, impact, and if so deemed, are not required to provide traffic-related information.

A preliminary subdivision plan must accompany a traffic impact study if the proposed development generates 50 trips or more during peak hours. Traffic studies for proposed developments of this size or larger are prepared by the applicant and reviewed by staff in order for the Planning Board to make the required findings regarding the adequacy of transportation facilities in the Subdivision Ordinance. In cases where a development generates fewer than 50 trips, the transportation staff must still review the preliminary plan in order for the Planning Board to make the required findings and may request (but not require) a limited traffic study or traffic counts to assist in making these findings. Developments generating five or fewer peak hour trips may be deemed to have a minimal, or de minimus, impact, and if so deemed, are not required to provide traffic-related information.

Guidelines

The Planning Board publishes the Guidelines for the Analysis of the Traffic Impact of Development Proposals (Guidelines). This document establishes criteria by which staff and applicants with land development proposals can assess the traffic impact of the development proposals and incorporates methods and practices currently being used to review and evaluate traffic conditions.

Reviews

Traffic is also reviewed in detail during the review of mixed-use and comprehensive design rezoning applications. Certain types of special exceptions require limited traffic analyses, but in accordance with the required special exception findings, such studies often focus on traffic safety. As noted earlier, detailed site plans are intended to review design issues and as such, generally do not involve the review of transportation adequacy issues.

Transit-Oriented Development

Prince George’s County is uniquely situated in the Washington region to exploit the regional interest in transit-oriented development. The county is home to 15 of the region’s 86 Metrorail stations. Within one-half mile of the county’s Metrorail stations are over 2,500 acres of undeveloped land, providing ample opportunities for innovative, mixed-use development with a strong emphasis on transit-oriented design. While many Metrorail stations are over capacity, 11 of 15 stations in Prince George’s County have the capacity to absorb additional Metrorail ridership growth.

Prince George’s County Planning has developed a dynamic website that allows you to learn about transit-oriented development (TOD) in the county. The TOD website is a user-friendly tool that provides information and access to the county’s TOD efforts. There, you will find useful links, plans, and Metro station area facts for the 15 stations located in Prince George’s County. We encourage you to ask questions.

Urban Design Standards

DPWT Urban Street Design Standards


Need Help? Contact Us

Countywide Planning Division

PHONE: 301-952-3680

FAX: 301-952-3749

Crystal Hancock

Acting Supervisor, Transportation Planning

Transportation Planning